Moving Beyond Outbound Productions: Using TAR 2.0 for Knowledge Generation and Protection

Lawyers search for documents for many different reasons. TAR 1.0 systems were primarily used to reduce review costs in outbound productions. As most know, modern TAR 2.0 protocols, which are based on continuous active learning (CAL) can support a wide range of review needs. In our last post, for example, we talked about how TAR 2.0 systems can be used effectively to support investigations.

That isn’t the end of the discussion. There are a lot of ways to use a CAL predictive ranking algorithm to move take on other types of document review projects. Here we explore various techniques for implementing a TAR 2.0 review for even more knowledge generation tasks than investigations, including opposing party reviews, depo prep and issue analysis, and privilege QC. Continue reading

How Can I Use TAR 2.0 for Investigations?

Across the legal landscape, lawyers search for documents for many different reasons. TAR 1.0 systems were primarily used to classify large numbers of documents when lawyers were reviewing documents for production. But how can you use TAR for even more document review tasks?

Modern TAR technologies (TAR 2.0 based on the continuous active learningor CALprotocol) include the ability to deal with low richness, rolling and small collections, and flexible inputs in addition to vast improvements in speed. These improvements also allow TAR to be used effectively in many more document review workflows than traditional TAR 1.0 systems. Continue reading

Five Questions to Ask Your E-Discovery Vendor About CAL

In the aftermath of studies showing that continuous active learning (CAL) is more effective than the first-generation technology assisted review (TAR 1.0) protocols, it seems like every e-discovery vendor is jumping on the bandwagon. At the least it feels like every e-discovery vendor claims to use CAL or somehow incorporate it into its TAR protocols.

Despite these claims, there remains a wide chasm between the TAR protocols available on the market today. As a TAR consumer, how can you determine whether a vendor that claims to use CAL actually does? Here are five basic questions you can ask your vendor to ensure that your review effectively employs CAL. Continue reading

Predict Proves Effective Even With High Richness Collection

Finds 94% of the Relevant Documents Despite Review Criteria Changes

Our client, a major oil and gas company, was hit with a federal investigation into alleged price fixing. The claim was that several of the drilling companies had conspired through various pricing signals to keep interest owner fees from rising with the market.1 The regulators believed they would find the evidence in the documents.

The request to produce was broad, even for this three-letter agency. Our client would have to review over 2 million documents. And the deadline to respond was short, just four months to get the job done. Continue reading

Optimizing Document Review in Compliance Investigations, Part 2

This article was originally published in Corporate Compliance Insights on August 6, 2018

Using Advanced Analytics and Continuous Active Learning to “Prove a Negative”

This is the second article in a two-part series that focuses on document review techniques for managing compliance in internal and regulatory investigations. Part 1 provided several steps for implementing an effective document review directed at achieving the objectives of a compliance investigation. This installment outlines an approach that can be used to demonstrate that there are no responsive documents to an equivalent statistical certainty – essentially proving a negative.

What Does it Mean to “Prove a Negative?”

The objective of a compliance investigation is most often to quickly locate the critical documents that will establish a cohesive fact pattern and provide the materials needed to conduct effective personnel interviews. In that situation, the documents are merely a means to an end. Continue reading

Optimizing Document Review In Compliance Investigations, Part 1

This article was originally published in Corporate Compliance Insights on July 17, 2018

Internal/Regulatory Investigations Versus Litigation

Too many corporations approach litigation and compliance investigations the same way, using the same technology, approach and people. But your approach to managing electronic information in internal and regulatory compliance investigations should differ from the one for litigation.

Most of the discussion surrounding compliance investigations focuses on best practices for planning and conducting personnel interviews. This article addresses document review, specifically electronic document review, an equally critical component of the investigation process directed at finding what some refer to as the “truth serum” for controlling those interviews and structuring much of the investigation. Continue reading

Hon. Paul Grimm and Kevin Brady of Redgrave Outline Admissibility of Digital Evidence

“Objection, foundation.”

To any seasoned trial attorney, the foundation objection shouldn’t trip up anyone. Akin to blocking and tackling in football, laying foundation for admission of evidence is almost taken for granted. But ask that same trial lawyer (only after a few adult beverages) if he or she has ever been tripped up on a foundation objection, many, if not most, will say they have. Heck, it happened to me on a couple of occasions when I was trying cases. Continue reading

57 Ways to Leave Your (Linear) Lover

A Case Study on Using Catalyst’s Insight Predict to Find Relevant Documents Without SME Training

A Big Four accounting firm with offices in Tokyo recently asked Catalyst to demonstrate the effectiveness of Insight Predict, technology assisted review (TAR) based on continuous active learning (CAL), on a Japanese language investigation. They gave us a test population of about 5,000 documents which had already been tagged for relevance. In fact, they only found 55 relevant documents during their linear review.

We offered to run a free simulation designed to show how quickly Predict would have found those same relevant documents. The simulation would be blind (Predict would not know how the documents were tagged until it presented its ranked list). That way we could simulate an actual Predict review using CAL. Continue reading

Using TAR Across Borders: Myths & Facts

As the world gets smaller, legal and regulatory compliance matters increasingly encompass documents in multiple languages. Many legal teams involved in cross-border matters, however, still hesitate to use technology assisted review (TAR), questioning its effectiveness and ability to handle non-English document collections.  They perceive TAR as a process that involves “understanding” documents. If the documents are in a language the system does not understand, then TAR cannot be effective, they reason.

The fact is that, done properly, TAR can be just as effective for non-English as it is for English documents. This is true even for the complex Asian languages including Chinese, Japanese and Korean (CJK). Although these languages do not use standard English-language delimiters such as spaces and punctuation, they are nonetheless candidates for the successful use of TAR. Continue reading

Catalyst Insight Review By Brett Burney

Recently, Brett Burney, e-discovery consultant and founder of Burney Consultants, reviewed Catalyst’s Insight Discovery search and review capabilities, which are part of Catalyst’s full EDRM platform comprising of Insight Legal Hold and Collect, Search & Review, Predict and Business Intelligence. We invited Brett to share his insights as a guest author.

Catalyst Insight – Lightning Quick, Responsive Review Platform for Instantly Searching Millions of Digital Files with a Built-In Continuous Active Learning Predictive Analytics Engine

It seems that Catalyst has always been on a mission to push the boundaries of applying advanced text analytics to enormous amounts of electronically stored information for eDiscovery and investigatory purposes… and it’s exciting to watch. Continue reading